This year, a new case of breast cancer will be diagnosed every 2 minutes!

This year, a new case of breast cancer will be diagnosed every 2 minutes!

October Is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States and worldwide (excluding skin cancer). This year, more than 251,300 women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Approximately 3 million women in the U.S. are living with breast cancer: 2 million who have been diagnosed and an estimated 1 million who do not yet know they have the disease! This year, a new case of breast cancer will be diagnosed every 2 minutes, and a woman will die from breast cancer every 13 minutes…

“Understanding the facts about breast cancer will help you take better care of yourself,” says Dr. Sam Speron, breast cancer expert and consumer advocate. “When diagnosed with breast cancer, learning the facts about the disease and discussing treatment options can be frightening and overwhelming. However, if diagnosed and treated appropriately, the survival rate is greater than 90%! Women need to know they are not alone. Women need to understand that this is something they can beat!”

Sam will reveal some interesting statistics to your audience:

o Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the U.S.
o A woman in the United States has a 1 in 8 chance of developing invasive breast cancer during her lifetime – this risk was 1 in 11 in 1975.
o All women are at risk for breast cancer. About 90% of women who develop breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease.
o Mammography screening does not prevent or cure breast cancer; however, it may detect the disease before symptoms occur.
o Older women are much more likely to get breast cancer than younger women.
o Combining all age groups, white (non-Hispanic) women are more likely to develop breast cancer than black women.
o Black women have a higher breast cancer mortality rate at every age, and a lower survival rate than white women.
o Death rates from breast cancer declined significantly during 1992 to 1998, with the largest decreases in younger women – both white and black.
o An estimated 1,500 cases will be diagnosed among men this year.